GMV and the Big Data-driven technological transformation

GMV has participated at the event "Big Data and Smart Data: Challenges and Opportunities" put on by the Technological Corporation of Andalusia (Corporación Tecnológica de Andalucía: CTA) in Seville’s Vodafone Smart Center. The event was attended by professionals from the public, private and academic sectors.

José Carlos Baquero, Head of the Development and Software Engineering Division of GMV Secure e-Solutions, gave a paper called “Big Data-driven Technological Transformation: Difficulties encountered and lessons learned”. José Carlos Baquero’s speech stressed the importance of knowing right from the start the business targets that Big Data technology is meant to respond to, and also drawing up a model that ensures the sustainability of a project of said characteristics. He also urged his audience to carry out proofs of concept in Cloud environments, without this calling for a specific infrastructure, but always centering on the organization’s value input. He wound up by showcasing the various Big Data projects that GMV is currently working on, in such sectors as fraud prevention, threat detection, digital surveillance, precision agriculture and the management of clinical and epidemiological data.

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GMV and the Big Data-driven technological transformation

José Carlos Baquero, Head of the Development and Software Engineering Division of GMV
Secure e-Solutions, giving his paper “Big Data-driven Technological Transformation:
Difficulties encountered and lessons learned"

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At the end of GMV’s intervention, the guests, ICT managers of various organizations, swapped notes on their experiences in Big Data approaches, for which, as José Carlos Baquero pointed out, “a realistic business approach is called for". In answer to the question “would we know how to mine and use the data we currently have in organizations”, the consensus opinion was that there is a need for clear objectives. It is not enough just to have “faith in the data”: simply storing them does not mean that any value will necessarily be extracted from them.

The closing theme of the event was the government’s role as custodian of the citizens’ data and the need of driving Open Data projects that provide third parties with this anonymized information, thus building up an industry around it.